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She developed a love for the outdoors that receded when she moved to Broomfield during her high school years.


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Price eventually decided to go into ministry while working at Urban Peak , an organization serving homeless youth in Denver. After seminary, Price became active with the United Methodist Church, and she was placed on a food and justice initiative that began in Instead of a food bank, is there a way that a congregation could turn it into a cooperative? Another aspect was using church land for farming. Yet, using land at established churches proved challenging, and committee members considered the possibility of breaking ground on undeveloped land.

Thus, The Land was born. The Land has been in development since , but worship services have taken place only within the last year and a half.


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The long-range plan for The Land is to create a 2-acre, edible labyrinth where 1 acre would be used to grow produce. The bounty would be shared with community-supported agriculture and partner organizations, and there would be a food stand where anyone who wanted food could stop by and get some.

Meanwhile, The Land relies on volunteers to help do the hard work. The day of my visit, a youth group from Oklahoma was doing various chores on the farm as part of a service trip. The outdoor worship services at The Land vary during the year. We have a minute worship service that is very simple. We have, usually, two to three songs in between communion, a message, an opening reading, and then we have a meal together. We had a meatless barbecue a couple of weeks ago. Challenges certainly loom for The Land, but Price is hopeful for the real impact that this ministry could have.

To be more reflective of this idea of discipleship. Flattening the hierarchy of creation and caring for all creatures is kind of the whole missional aspect of our community. What does a worshipping community in Denver look like, or should it sound like, feel like, or taste like?

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Craig was previously pastoring a congregation in northern New Jersey, but he and Jeanine yearned for a transition. They sought guidance from some of the higher ups in their denomination, the Christian Reformed Church, and were encouraged to plant a new church in either Houston or Denver. The Broeks knew that they wanted to start an urban farm-based church. Though Houston had fewer zoning hurdles and higher levels of religiosity.

Cultivating Spiritual Growth

Today, they manage 13 home gardens throughout the Denver metro area. Pastor Broek blesses the food, and then a weekly discussion topic is introduced. The congregation is a mix of Christians who love what they do, but want nothing to do with the garden; non-Christians who just love the farming aspect; and people who just like the Broeks. One of the biggest challenges has been getting regular volunteers to help with the gardening.

I wondered why that was the case because it seemed to be one of the most compelling aspects of this ministry. Craig underscored her point. Indeed, growth in the early Christian church which was fueled by potluck dinners hosted by believers in their homes.

After seminary, Price became active with the United Methodist Church, and she was placed on a food and justice initiative that began in Instead of a food bank, is there a way that a congregation could turn it into a cooperative? Another aspect was using church land for farming. Yet, using land at established churches proved challenging, and committee members considered the possibility of breaking ground on undeveloped land.

Thus, The Land was born. The Land has been in development since , but worship services have taken place only within the last year and a half. The long-range plan for The Land is to create a 2-acre, edible labyrinth where 1 acre would be used to grow produce. The bounty would be shared with community-supported agriculture and partner organizations, and there would be a food stand where anyone who wanted food could stop by and get some. Meanwhile, The Land relies on volunteers to help do the hard work.

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The day of my visit, a youth group from Oklahoma was doing various chores on the farm as part of a service trip. The outdoor worship services at The Land vary during the year. We have a minute worship service that is very simple. We have, usually, two to three songs in between communion, a message, an opening reading, and then we have a meal together. We had a meatless barbecue a couple of weeks ago. Challenges certainly loom for The Land, but Price is hopeful for the real impact that this ministry could have.

To be more reflective of this idea of discipleship. Flattening the hierarchy of creation and caring for all creatures is kind of the whole missional aspect of our community. What does a worshipping community in Denver look like, or should it sound like, feel like, or taste like? Craig was previously pastoring a congregation in northern New Jersey, but he and Jeanine yearned for a transition. They sought guidance from some of the higher ups in their denomination, the Christian Reformed Church, and were encouraged to plant a new church in either Houston or Denver.

The Broeks knew that they wanted to start an urban farm-based church. Though Houston had fewer zoning hurdles and higher levels of religiosity. Today, they manage 13 home gardens throughout the Denver metro area. Pastor Broek blesses the food, and then a weekly discussion topic is introduced. The congregation is a mix of Christians who love what they do, but want nothing to do with the garden; non-Christians who just love the farming aspect; and people who just like the Broeks.

One of the biggest challenges has been getting regular volunteers to help with the gardening. I wondered why that was the case because it seemed to be one of the most compelling aspects of this ministry. Craig underscored her point. Indeed, growth in the early Christian church which was fueled by potluck dinners hosted by believers in their homes.

Montclair was a dwindling, aging congregation when Boyd arrived. She hoped to revive the congregation, but Montclair was eventually closed and reopened as Be3. Quiet Gardens provide a context for learning about these sources and resources, and enjoying silence, attentiveness and contemplative prayer. Time in a Quiet Garden can be helpful for our health and wellbeing, as well as our spiritual journey. Deep restfulness and refreshment within the beauty of creation can often take place, and there will be many opportunities for attentiveness and moments of wonder and transcendence to occur.

All these restore body, mind and soul. Our care for the environment creates balance for daily life and inspiration for compassionate activism. Time in a Quiet Garden enhances our relationship with the earth and encourages care for creation. They are hosted by creative people and groups. And time spent in them allows moments of inspiration and creativity to come to the surface.

Juneau Community Gardens

Guided by our past tradition, we are open to the freshness of the future. Time spent in the natural environment will inspire our reflection and invigorate our action. Read a summary of our latest strategy. The original vision for Quiet Gardens was developed by Philip Roderick in the early s.

Enthusiasm and support soon came from others who were drawn to the contemplative dimension of the Gospel and who wished to explore the creative tension between action and contemplation, between involvement and withdrawal, between work and prayer. Read more about we started…. They are places where I can dwell deeply, through being in the slip-stream of prayer, contemplation and renewal, and find life again in all of its abundance.

Through the work of the Quiet Garden Movement, I pray that this will also be true for many other people, and I remain grateful to those who open their gardens so that others can slow down and rest in God's abundant love in Jesus. Gardens have a way of seeping in to your soul and you find yourself enjoying the air and watching for miracles. In a hurried and distracted world we need garden sanctuaries, places that ground us. We need Quiet Gardens. In an increasingly busy and noisy world, we often forget the importance of finding stillness and peace during our daily lives. We do not get the opportunity to stop, be still and quiet and spend some time with ourselves and with God.

The Quiet Garden Movement offers people the space and opportunity to find this peace and time for reflection, away from the distractions and worries of the outside world. A garden looking quiet to me is actually full of natural sound, the music of creation which is the music that I join in, every time I open my mouth to sing a hymn or to say a prayer. It is a fundamental principle of liturgy that our own services are simply joining in what is already happening which is the worship of all creation of the Creator.

There is deep wisdom here, and invariably it overflows in love.